Acceptable standard of health

What is an acceptable standard of health?

Visa applicants must demonstrate that they have an acceptable standard of health. There are different requirements for different visa types.

 

Acceptable standard of health

Immigration New Zealand considers you to have an acceptable standard of health if you are:

  • unlikely to be a danger to public health
  • unlikely to be a burden on public health services
  • fit for the purpose of entry to New Zealand.

 

How can you show that you have an acceptable standard of health?

To show that you have an acceptable standard of health you may have to complete a medical certificate and submit it with your application.

The general rule is that you will need to submit a medical certificate and a chest X-ray certificate with your visa application if you intend to stay in New Zealand for more than 12 months.

Read more about the different requirements for medicals for different visa applications.

 

What happens if you do not have an acceptable standard of health?

If you or any family member included in your application does not have an acceptable standard of health, your application will be declined, unless Immigration New Zealand will grant you a medical waiver.

 

Can you get a medical waiver?

For residence visa applications, medical waivers will only be considered, if you meet all of the other requirements for approval of your application.

For temporary entry class visa applications, medical waivers will only be considered, if you meet all of the other requirements for approval of your application, and:

• you are the partner or dependent child of a New Zealand citizen or residence class visa holder, or

• you have applied for a temporary visa as a seconded business person, or

• you have been recognised has having refugee or protection status in New Zealand.

 

When will a medical waiver not be granted?

You will not be able to obtain a medical waiver, if you or any family member included in your application:

  • requires dialysis treatment, or an Immigration New Zealand medical assessor has indicated that dialysis treatment will be required within five years from the date of the medical assessment, or
  • has severe haemophilia, or
  • has a physical, intellectual, cognitive and/or sensory incapacity that requires full-time care, including care in the community, or
  • currently has tuberculosis (TB) (any form including pulmonary, non-pulmonary, multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant TB) and has not completed full treatment for TB as outlined in the New Zealand Guidelines for Tuberculosis Control, or
  • has a history, diagnostic findings or treatment for multidrug-resistant or extensively drug-resistant TB, unless they have been cleared by a New Zealand respiratory or infectious diseases specialist upon review of their file or review of the applicant as outlined in the New Zealand Guidelines for Tuberculosis Control.

 

If you have any health problems and think that you might have difficulties demonstrating that you have an acceptable standard of health, please talk to one of our Licensed Immigration Advisers. They are experienced in assisting our clients with applying for medical waivers. 

 

 

Read more about Minimum Health requirements for visa applicants:

 

To find out more about your chances, please go back to our Quick Self-Check Guide.


 

Ask our Licensed Immigration Advisers

If you want to find out more about obtaining the right visa for New Zealand, contact Julia Cooke, Licensed Immigration Adviser at NZIC.

Ask Julia for a Free Assessment